A Cheap Drug Is Found to Save Bleeding Victims

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For months, a simple generic drug has been saving lives on America’s battlefields by slowing the bleeding of even gravely wounded soldiers.

Even better, it is cheap. But its very inexpensiveness has slowed its entry into American emergency rooms, where it might save the lives of bleeding victims of car crashes, shootings and stabbings — up to 4,000 Americans a year, according to a recent study.

Because there is so little profit in it, the companies that make it do not champion it.

However, the drug is edging slowly closer to adoption as hospitals in New York and other major cities debate adding it to their pharmacies. The drug, tranexamic acid, has long been sold over the counter in Britain and Japan for heavy menstrual flow.

After a groundbreaking 2010 trial on 20,000 hemorrhaging trauma patients in 40 countries showed that it saved lives, the British and American Armies adopted it. The World Health Organization added it to its essential drugs list last year, and British ambulances now carry it.

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Star (right) with her Ate Sofie.

Of Star and advocating for people with hemophilia

By | Bleeding Disorders, Featured, Hemophilia, Philippines, Star | 3 Comments

We’re back in the comforts of our home now. Star was discharged yesterday afternoon after being transfused with 14 bags of packed red blood cells and cryo-precipate.

Everything’s back to normal. Star woke up early today and made “dibs” (their term now for laying first claim on something) on the computer. Over breakfast she declared she would go to church early to serve in Sunday school. She’s a volunteer of the toddlers’ class and loves to “fan-girl” over cute little babies.

This girl continuously amazes me. One day, she passes out. The next, she doesn’t look any inch unwell at all. She is a carefree young lady who loves life and never lets anything get in the way. I guess it’s also her way of trying to defy a life-long disorder.

It’s never easy to balance between giving your child the most normal life possible and at the same time, facing the realities that her “normal” will never be the same as the normal-normal of people without disorders.

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